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Search Results 0 to 28 of about 29 (some duplicates have been removed)
the tragedy must ends. collins for tighter gun control. >> . international study put in germany at the bottom of the table or pay equality among men and women and female executives remained a rarity. >> dortmund dealing another blow as the season reaches the halfway point. >> president obama has set himself and the nation a political challenge following the mass killing of schoolchildren in new 10, conn., calling for an end to the tragedies indicating he is ready to push for tighter gun control. >> congressional democrats have also indicated they are preparing an aggressive agenda for tighter control on the ownership of weapons. the youths who killed 27 people, most of them children, was heavily armed. >> 27 enderle figures, each of them representing and a victim. >> their release the names of the victims. >> we are requesting you expect -- respect their privacy of the go through this difficult time. >> president obama struggling to find words of comfort. >> can we say we are truly doing enough to give all the children of this country the chance they deserve to live out their lives and happin
the victors of the war. hitler had invaded germany in 1941, and they fought back against the germans, and they kept going against berlin. >> define stalinism. >> stalinism was a developed system of control. it believed it could control everything, not only in politics and economics but social life, civic life, sports clubs and chess clubs. in the stalinist system, there were no independent institutions of any kind. no independent voices of any kind were allowed to speak. all the economy was under state control, and all of society was. there was a cultural aspect, too. the arts were under stalinist control, and there was a cold of stalin himself. his portrait hung everywhere. there was a cult of stalin himself. >> i grew up in a small town of indiana, and one of my streets, you talk about radio casuth. >> he was was a hungarian hero of an earlier time. there was a radio, and they adopted the name of a previous deliberate thing hero, and in 1956 he would have to call it anti-stalinist radio. >> what was the circumstance? >> 56 is the end of the stalinist period. he died in 53, and afte
germany in 1941, and they fought back against the germans, and they kept going against berlin. >> the fine stalinism. >> stalinism was developed system,-- define stalinism. >> stalinism was a developed system of control. it believed it could control everything, not only in politics and economics but social life, civic life, sports clubs and chess clubs. in the stalinist system, there were no independent institutions of any kind. no independent voices of any kind were allowed to speak. all the economy was under state control, and all of society was. there was a cultural aspect, too. the arts were under stalinist control, and there was a cold of stalin himself. his portrait hung everywhere. -- there was a cult of stalin himself. >> i grew up in a small town of indiana, and one of my streets, you talk about radio casuth. \ >> he was the hon gary and hero of an earlier time, and much later on, -- he was often gering and hero of an earlier time, -- was a hungarian hero of an earlier time. there was a radio, and they adopted the name of a previous deliberate thing hero, and in 1956 he would have
democrats i chose to poland, hungary, and east germany. they have different historical background. they belong to different empires in the 19th century. they have different political traditions and mostly because they have given experiences of the war. germany was nazi germany. poland resisted very strongly. the nazis had one of the most resistant movements in europe. the hon variants were different. hungarians- the were different. i was interested in how did they react and the subsequent process of sovietization. >> how would you describe the situation in the country's today, the lifestyle, the economy, the openness to democracy and all that? >> all of them are democracies. east germany is not east germany. it is part of germany, so it is indistinguishable. west germany is poorer in some ways than poland, a country that has recovered more vigorously than the eastern part of germany. poland is a very vibrant democracy, maybe to vibrant -- too vibrant, but it plays a very important and central role in europe. it is a member of nato. it is the largest of the former east european cou
they understand because most people in this town, and the media do not know that germany is approaching 100% renewable energy and there is already a nation that is 100% solar and the cca plan is just failure. designed to fail, so if you're not aware of that, if you never heard that before you should talk to somebody who knows and there's people who have written books on this how this policy must fail. it's just scientifically designed upside down and backwards. it can't possibly succeed but san francisco needs because we're a leadership town we need a policy that will win. the mayor talked to the mayor of freeberg germany who has a policy and we think we should talk to them over there. thank you. >> thank you. is there any other member of the public that would like to speak? seeing none public comment is closed. colleagues i think i have a sense how we should proceed and we will move forward and introduce a resolution expanding the ability of staff to focus on other issues besides cca and we will work with our staff to figure out the most ix pidishes way to bring the position in house
as the other cold war from pointe du hoc all the way through germany. when the even lead to patton's army at one point. let me just go from there. what's next is a story, part of the story i didn't really know about until i started researching it. these men, men accomplish their secondary objective which is to set up a roadblock that would cut the road that connected omaha beach in utah beach. it ran across the top of pointe du hoc. they set up in an l-shaped line for the next two days, the germans counterattacked relentless. and tired platoons were taken up by the germans to they broke through party line. only dog company held in his l-shaped line. the germans had reinforcements. this was a very, very close knit type thing. one of the men that was attacked of the second ranger battalion, a girl who was the number one commander had fought in north africa, and one of the most poignant things he had was, i had never come so close being either killed or captured that my. he was convinced that that was what was going to happen. the germans will relentlessly counter attacking. from pointe du h
can institute under executive powers, and get around pg&e that way. in germany it's created 400,000 new jobs. it's created $4 billion in cash flow through the economy and making the german economy the strongest in europe and it's the -- it basically is a policy that pays the homeowners so it makes investing in solar attractive to homeowners. right now it's not attractive to put a hundred solar panels on your roof, but under this policy germany has made tremendous advances. there is one country in the world that is 100% solar power as of last month. cca cannot possibly do what they need done. the word -- you can boil this whole argument down to one question, one word and that is "inevitability". we are running out of the oil. we are drowning in our own waste. we need to stop burning oil and the way you could do it is putting a couple hundred solar panels on each house in san francisco. this was indirectly mentioned in the guardian editorial but they don't say it and it's because they don't understand it. it's important to understand what being done in germany and other c
won't do particularly well, but germany and italy maybe next year have a potential surprise on the upside. >> how much of a surprise? >> it will not be a fast recovery. the ecb will be forced to do more, but they'll be drald dragged into it. so things will have to get worse before they act. so i don't really think -- >> what more actions? they have a t program waiting to go. what more actions are you talking about? >> the key policy rate for the ecb is likely indeed in the first quarter. they can take dpopt deposit rate negative. by the middle of next year, they'll be doing outright qe. i've been talking about this for ages. they haven't done it so maybe they won't do it. but i'm assuming that the outlook for inflation for the eurozone is -- >> how are they going to get around -- look, i know the bundes bank has a fear of hyper inflation. i just don't -- are they going to get around all the -- because even if they do it on the inflation mandate, are they going to get around the objections about outright money printing? germans would see it as that. >> they would see it as ou
to the rest of the world, if you look at germany, uk, japan, france, all of whom have very strong gun regulations, we have more gun deaths in one week than they have in an entire year, and the incidents -- the number of times in which guns inside a home are used for self-defense are exceedingly small, on the order of maybe 1 in 15, 1 in 20 as compared to the number of times when a gun is used either for suicide or a homicide. anybody that looks at the data here is quite clear that on the whole, particularly things like assault weapons, create far, far more kor nage in th carnage in this country than they prevent. to a large extent the reason why i think progressives have not been able to mount an effective campaign for sensible gun laws, it's been a failure of the progressive movement, and i think that will now change with progressives. they must realize they have to make this an election issue. all of the polls show that the public is widely in favor of sensible gun regulations. i will point out what i said on friday. president clinton after columbine when we were meeting in the oval
like britain and germany. we look back knowing the result of all of this, which, of course, led to the emergence, really, of a nation state for the first time, and one with much greater powers and reach than it had before, and you can forget how procariuos the union was for a long period of time, but i think it's also important to recognize, and this is about state rights and slavery in terms of the civil war. there was a broad state right sentiment, but the only states that seceded from the union was slave states, and i don't think that's insignificant too. there's no way of understanding secession and state rights outside the slavery question. >> host: professor hahn, 1863, the emancipation proke clay mages, -- proclamation, did it put an end to any discussion and any existing remanents of slavery? >> guest: it didn't. it was a very, very important moment because the united states, the lincoln administration, exercising his powers as commanders in chief, it's a war measure, abolishes slavery without compensation to owners. this is new. the northern states abolished slavery gra
and paella. he spoke italian and air back and encouraged me to study germany, learn italian to communicate in tu knee sha and learn spanish to speak with my patients. i saw the world through his eyes. i remember walking into a restaurant in cairo and the waiter saying something in arabic to chris. he chuckled and translated. when you walk in, the whole room lights up. was that just chris or beauty of the arab language or how perfectly they understood each other? chris incorporated the wonderful values of our parents and shared these with the world. he's always been with me. he was the first to see my stand in the crib. he probably taught me to walk. he set the standards for our family really high and brought wonderful friends into our lives, friends who are like brothers and sisters to us now. chris was my most important mentor. he showed me how. so it is not important who your mother is only, not just important who your father is but very important who your big brother is. we had the best. the world needs a lot more big brothers like chris stevens. >> i am tom stevens, to give you the lit
and japan and germany and basically assure the renewable energy community there is a guaranteed off taker and price paid for electricity generated from a renewable energy project. it's normally 10 or 20 years and set higher than the going rate for gas or electricity generation so it provides a sole developer to say i have this contract for this off taker whether the caa or whoever toy bathe power and. >> >> and guaranteed to buy it from me and i can go to the bank i have this stream of income if you give me a loan. >> please continue. >> thanks, so one of the areas -- also that is applicable to efficiency is addressing barriers for 10 -- tenants and may be are tenants in their spaces and critical to reduce this for efficiency and new due to incentives or they don't have access to physical resources like their roof so expanding energy to renewable energy is one opportunity that would help the renewable energy space. right now all ratepayers pay into -- for example the state fund that goes towards the solar incentive but across the state only a quarter of houses can take advantage of on the
in the context globally. compare canada, germany, australia. where do we stand when it comes to gun deaths in america? >> our gun homicide rates is greater by orders of magnitude compared to all other comparable societies. which is to say, industrialized democracies. our overall violent crime rate -- this is a distinction worth making -- is not as distinct. in other words, you're not necessarily in greater peril of having your car stolen or having some he eu over the head with a baseball bat in the u.s. in fact, nyc is safer than many other big cities around the world in terms of violent crime overall. but we have a gun homicide problem. our crime is more lethal because we have more guns. >> talking about something like 9000 homicide gun deaths in the united states every year. i think that it has let 150. germany, 170. and then you would include suicide and what is it in the u.s.? >> we have roughly something in order of 30,000 gun deaths a year, but the large majority are suicide. >> we're talking to paul barrett. when we come back, we will host a debate on the issue of gun violence in am
morning. all right. coming up new at 10, germany's chancellor angela merkel says europe will have to work very hard to it maintain its current standard of living. at the top of the hour, find out what she's saying about welfare and here is another development from overseas. we brought you the story last week, french actor gerard depardu, he is leaving home, leaving france because of higher taxes and handed in his passport. now, the french prime minister has some choice words for mr. depardu. he's obviously in the happy with him and find out exactly what he said at ten o'clock eastern time this morning. time is money. 30 seconds, here is what else we've got for you, an in japan, again, a landslide win, so, what's the new prime minister going to do about the world's worst debt problem? print more money and stimulate more, too. build more infrastructure. will that work? we have our own resident japan expert. question, is jeff immelt's cozy relationship with the president costing general electric shareholders money? we will be discussing it. and i lost on friday when i questioned "the washing
numbers of irish people and germans who are coming here because of terrible economic situations in germany. and others coming into the united states and posing a lot of problems a lot of people in the northeast, especially in terms of assimilation. a lot of those immigrants go and fight in the u.s. mexico border. the reason they do that is because they don't have opportunities economically in the united states. for the most part, they are not very good soldiers. the san patricio -- those are the deserters from the mexican war. some people think that they were irish because they carry an irish line. but the san patricio's, one can mostly say is that they were mostly catholic. one thing i did didn't talk about in the story is there is an intense tension between the catholicism of mexico and the mainstream protestant beliefs of most americans. a lot of americans actually go to mexico and think that they are going to convert catholics or regain catholicism and basically get red of the catholic thread. i was lucky enough to have a student that was a graduate student who could read german and he
them in germany but you can only shoot three bullets and then have to reload to prevent these kind of tragedies. >> there was also a similar incidence in china of someone going in but they didn't have a gun so nobody died. it happened on the exact same day. >> stephanie: if we all go to our regular talking points, we're never going to get anything done. all of those catchphrases, guns don't kill people, all of that stuff, there is something we can do. and i honestly feel like everything's a part of it. mental health, cutbacks that affect mental health. obviously guns. senator feinstein's bill should be the start of what we do. absolutely we should ban assault weapons and the clips and close the loophole at gun shows. >> a woman was calling said her granddaughter's school has bulletproof glass and metal doors. you can't get in. >> stephanie: louis gohmert on cue, we need teachers armed. we need more guns. >> we need 6-year-olds armed. >> stephanie: seriously first grade principals, we need them armed like rambo?
a lot of things to do. we know the fact that a country like germany has 158 gun deaths a year and we have 9,000 to 10,000 a year. we know what has to be done. i mean, if we could really do what we should do, i would make it a crime to possess, after a period of buy-backs, a crime to possess an assault rifle or high capacity magazine. as it is a crime to possess drugs. that's certainly more harmful than drugs. that's not likely to happen but the least we can do is ban the sale of assault weapons, ban the sale of high ammunition clips, get rid of the gun show loophole under which anyone can buy a gun -- >> on site. >> -- on site at a gun show. ban gun trafficking, that is limit sale of guns to one a month or something so you can't go to virginia, buy 40 weapons and ship it illegally into new york where you have stronger gun control laws. these are things we can do, we know to do, and we know will greatly reduce the number of innocent people killed every year. they won't eliminate it but they will greatly reduce it. i was struck by the fact that everybody is going to investigate adam la
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public shootings prior to friday? it was germany. germany had three of the five worst public school shootings in the world. now, they have extremely strict gun control laws. you can't get semiautomatic weapons. it takes a year to get a bolt action long rifle there. yet they has the worst record than we have here in the united states, even with this attack. so i -- >> i don't see how any of that brings you to the decision that the answer is to get rid of gun laws. the other question i would ask you -- >> because they serve as a magnet for these attacks. >> or -- or a rational person could say -- or a rational person could say that having access to a high-powered semiautomatic rifle is inappropriate. that there is no reason to go deer hunting with that, no reason to have access to that. that's the connection that these killers have access to those weapons. let me ask you another question. >> no, i want to answer that that you just said. no, i don't argue second amendment. i argue crime. that's what i do. i want to answer your question here. these guns are just like any hunting rifle.
in the u.s., real estate in hong kong, and the optics industry in germany? at t. rowe price, we understand the connections of a complex, global economy. it's just one reason over 75% of our mutual funds beat their 10-year lipper average. t. rowe price. invest with confidence. request a prospectus or summary prospectus with investment information, risks, fees and expenses to read and consider carefully before investing. >> brian: an after math of an over night bomb in kabul, stan stan. a u.s. militarior - military contractor. carolina panth thers - panthers celebrates and all of the sudden the guard rail collapses . no word yet on if anybody was hurt. gretch. >> gretchen:, brian. house speaker john boehner removing a stumbling block. raising tax rate for those making a million or more? could this seal a deal with the white house. hold your horses. this is far from a done deal. >> this is a very important shift. speaker boehner is retreating on an issue principle and said you can raise tax rates on wealthy people . previously he said we'll get more money out of limiting deductions. it is an
away the guns from the people in germany. you saw the results. host: what about other kinds of gun laws? you talked about farming and officer -- arming an officer, some type of official presence in schools, but what about a bill to ban assault weapons? caller: it used to be and i'm getting mixed -- are they going to bring up banning semi- automatic rifles? there were not been used in the crime, from what i understand. host: good morning to lois, a republican. caller: it is the people we have to worry about. it is mental illness. families recognize their children as they are growing up. if that could be curtailed, i know they would hate to put them in a mental institution. i would, too, because they love their child just the same. but those children that grow up with mental illness, it does not matter how they get it, they are going to get weapons of some sort. it is not the guns that the problem, it's the people. they have to collect those mentally ill people. host: would you lock them all up? caller: no. you hear about doctors. i don't know quite, but that is what the problem is, menta
a friend in germany and all over the world, and they're all responding to this. that's why i think it's important that we get this message out and let's all join hands and let's lead with love in everything we do. not just getting through this tragedy. but rebuilding what we want this country to do for our children. >> how are these parents, though, going to -- i can only imagine, you know, you were there at the funeral, how could these parents move forward now, knowing what has just happened friday morning? >> that's a long journey. i have a little bit of experience personally with that. not like this but a little bit. and it's a hollowness. it's weak knees. it's all the horrible things everyone imagines. all you can do is take it a day at a time and depend on everybody you love and i would tell our community that two weeks is about the time that the family goes away, and that's the important time for friends to rush in. because then all the family members are out of town. but it's going to take a lot of love and support. it really is. >> it's a mourning process. >> it's awful. >> i
over in europe move. the bundesbank, whatever it is over in germany, 44 basis points to 31. so that market moved. did have some movements in the market but you guys didn't pick it up. but it's important because it's important because you've got these series of puts over in europe. you've got the u.s. going, the series of puts in europe. relatively easy money. we expect some tightening at the year end but we didn't get them. i'm talking about bond markets. you see how spain, italy traded. so we're kind of nervous. the street is kind of out of paper so they can't screw it up right now. oh, shoot. i forgot to say hi to my mom! hi, mom! so that's important. because she'll get really mad if i don't. so, you have -- so you have -- >> you haven't said anything bad yet. it all sounds good. >> i'll tell you bad stuff if you want to hear it. >> no, we don't want to hear it. >> bottom line, joe, there's a trillion dollars, you got more money coming in of stimulus, and i got this market next year. so i got all kinds of different markets right now. i got credit markets which we know a lot a
Search Results 0 to 28 of about 29 (some duplicates have been removed)

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